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Best sushi restaurants in Amsterdam

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Best sushi restaurants in Amsterdam

Amsterdam is full of sushi restaurants, but what are the real gems? Chances are you will find some real hidden sushi gemsin Amsterdam is not yet known. And they don’t have to be very expensive. We researched and collected the very best sushi restaurants in Amsterdam, especially for you. Because what’s better than an evening of lemurs, nigiri and handrolls? After the photos below, your mouth is already watering.

1. Akitsu

On the corner of Rozengracht, next to the Fire Station, you will find Akitsu. The menu is traditional Japanese and offers more than just standard sushi. Expect high quality Japanese delicacy.

Rozengracht 228-230, Akitsu

2. Zushi

For the extra experience, go to Zushi. At Zushi you eat sushi the way it should be: on a conveyor belt. Choose à la carte dishes or specials from the band.

Amstel 20, Zushi

3. Sushilee

You can also enjoy good sushi at the Zuidas. At Sushilee you can eat the more famous sushi combinations, different types of sashimi and nigiris. The restaurant has an LA-like atmosphere: light, clean and cozy.

George Gershwinlaan 534, Sushilee

4. AND

One of Amsterdam’s kept secrets is EN Japanese kitchen & Sake bar. The Japanese owners once came to Amsterdam to work for Yamazato at Hotel Okura, but to our great fortune they opened their own restaurant serving high quality Japanese cuisine.

Dusartstraat 53h, EN

5. Sushi ‘n Sake

Between the Surinamese roti spots and Indian tokos, you will also find Sushi ‘n Sake, a cozy Japanese place on the Dapperstraat. Eat fresh sushi and sashimi at the bar or one of the few tables, accompanied by a glass of sake.

Dapperstraat 34a, Sushi ‘n Sake

6. Dragon I

Ask many Amsterdammers about their secret sushi spot and they answer with Dragon I. This place may not look very attractive at first glance, but the food you get served there certainly is.

Amstelveenseweg 154HS, Dragon I

7. Kagetsu

Even though you are in Hartenstraat, at Kagetsu you imagine yourself in Japan. Small but very nice.

Hartenstraat 17, Kagetsu

8. Nooch

Another top shop in the Nine Streets: Nooch. At this cozy little place in the always nice Reestraat you can eat a mix of sushi, sashimi, noodles, rice dishes and more Japanese dishes.

Reestraat 11, Nooch

9. Kaiko

Kaiko is currently temporarily closed.

Real Japanese in Amsterdam have been visiting Kaiko for years. The business is small, hard to find and has no website. However, reservation is a must. And believe us, it’s worth it.

Jeker Street 114, Kaiko

10. Geisha

Modern Japanese, but atmospheric; that’s the best way to describe Geisha. You can eat delicious sushi here within walking distance of Central Station. Fun fact: they also serve dim sum.

Prins Hendrikkade 106A, Geisha

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May be interested: Top 25 museums in the Netherlands

Berry moved to the Netherlands for her art studies. She is living in Amsterdam for 16 years. You can see her in Amsterdam streets with her fancy pink bike. She is a professional photographer and blog journal lover.

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All about Heineken Beer

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All about Heineken Beer

Heineken beer, Heineken alcohol content, Heineken Experience, Heineken 0.0, Heineken 3, Non-alcoholic Heineken 0.0, Amsterdam beer, Dutch beer…

Heineken beer ; Dutch beer scissors based in Amsterdam.

It has 5% alcohol and is a pilsener type beer.

size 960 16 9 heineken84

In 2017, the first non- alcoholic Heineken beer, “Heineken 0.0” was produced.

It is the third largest beer producing company in the world. Heineken beer is consumed daily at 25 million liters and is sold in 192 countries.

heineken beer

Heineken also has beers from many different brands that it has acquired or collaborated with in Mexico, China, Australia and Africa.

Heineken beer sponsors the UEFA Champions League, Rugby World Championship, Formula 1 World Championship.

heineken bottle top

The factory where the first Heineken beer was produced in 1863 was transformed into the “Heineken Tasting and Information Center” in 1991, and tours began to be organized. These tours became the most preferred tours in Amsterdam. In 2001, the name of the center was changed to “ Heineken Experience” .

Heineken Beer Varieties

Heineken

heineken Varieties

Heineken 3

Heineken 3

It is a lower calorie, lower carb beer.

It was named the world’s best light beer in 2013 and 2014.

In 2015, he received a gold medal in the “European Beer Star Awards” competition.

Heineken 0.0

heineken zero

 

Alcohol-free Heineken.

Heineken Extra Cold

Heineken Extra Cold

Cooled at zero degrees for longer coolness and refreshment.

Draft beer passes through the frosted beer tower, while skewers are chilled in the Sub Zero refrigerator.

powerpointdesign heineken

Some major brands of Heineken include:

33 Export, France

Affligem, Belgium

Almaza, Lebanon

Amstel, Netherlands

Bintang, Indonesia

Birra Moretti, Italy

Birra Ichnusa, Italy

Bralima, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Brand, Netherlands

Cruzcampo, Spain

Calanda, Switzerland

Dos more, Mexico

Desperados, France

Dreher, Italy (Trieste) and Hungary (Budapest)

Eichhof, Switzerland

Foster, Australia (in most parts of Europe)

Gosser, Austria (Steiermark)

Hacker-Pschorr, Germany (Munich)

Heineken, Netherlands

Hoepfner, Germany (Karlsruhe)

Kaiser, Austria (Lower Austria)

Karlovačko, Croatia

Kingfisher, India

Kulmbacher, Germany (Kulmbach)

Lapin Kulta, Finland

Murphy, Ireland

Newcastle Brown Ale, England

Paulaner, Germany (Munich)

Sagres, Portugal

Sol, Mexico

Soproni, Hungary

Schwechat, Austria (Lower Austria)

Starobrno, Czech Republic

Strongbow (cider), England

Zipfer, Austria (Upper Austria)

Zlatý Bazant, Slovakia

Zywiec, Poland

 

 

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Dutch Cuisine for Gourmets: Authentic recipes, delicacies and specialties

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Dutch Cuisine for Gourmets: Authentic recipes, delicacies and specialties

Dutch cuisine is famous for its originality and traditions; there is a lot about fish. It is associated with cheese and licorice desserts around the world, but national cuisines are beyond these accepted concepts. 

At first glance, cooking local dishes is easy. Still, they have a high calorie content that tourists need to prepare. Surprisingly, the foundation of Dutch cuisine was born at a time when she taught girls to cook delicious, saturated and cheapest dishes. Locals love simple and quick food, considering others a waste of time. That’s why smoked sausage peas, pea soup or herring herring are still popular.

Only fish caught between May and July are used to cook the famous herring. The Dutch eat it whole, with the tail at the head and not cut into pieces. In the Netherlands, a lot of attention is paid to sausages. It is imperative to try smoked sausages served with vegetable dishes. Another authentic meal you can only try in the Netherlands is the tablespoon. Potatoes, broccoli, onions, spinach, etc. It is a kind of puree made of different vegetables. The cure was invented in the 16th century. This dish is an example of simple and high-calorie Dutch cuisine.

Special attention should be paid to Dutch cheeses, which are famous all over the world due to their high quality and unique taste. Every year, the Dutch eat an average of 20 kg of cheese. The most famous varieties include Gouda, Edamer, Maasdam, Leiden, Grakaas, Roomano and others. Gouda has been the most popular cheese in the Netherlands since the 19th century. This species has a fairly robust, even dry, consistent and recognizable scent. Another famous cheese, Maasdam, is known for its large holes and saturated sweet-smelling taste. Fans of spicy flavors like Leyden cheese made with cumin and cloves. Roomano is one of the rarest and most expensive cheeses; It matures for more than 4 years. www.orangesmile.com all rights reserved.

Hollanders love sweets. One of the most popular items here are monpazier candies, which are small colorful lollipops. It is cooked mainly from two ingredients – sweet and salty licorice. Monpazier souvenirs can be found in almost any store. Another popular treat is sling-Waffles. These are traditional round Waffles with soft caramel filling. Another dessert that absorbs all the features of Dutch cuisine is poffertjes. These are something made from buckwheat flour and yeast. They have high calorific properties and are usually sold in winter on cold days. They are eaten with whipped cream, syrup or berries. You should definitely try the limeburg cake with fruit filling. This is one of the oldest and most authentic dishes in the country.

For the Dutch, alcoholic drinks are a way to relax after a hard day’s work, celebrate royal holidays or just spend time with friends. Beer, especially lagers, is very popular in the Netherlands. Amstel and Heineken are the most popular brands. Historically, beer was drunk by both children and adults because, unlike water, it had no infections and bacteria in it. Jeanneau gin stands out among spirits. It is made from barley and juniper berries. Drunk with beer or added coffee.

The Netherlands is famous for their stinginess, which is evident in their gastronomic preferences. It is not customary to serve sumptuous meals, and leftover food after the feast is usually thrown away. Coffee and tea are very popular here. The traditional time for tea is between 10-11:00 am and 7-08:00 am. Milk is also popular here, although the Dutch call it coffee with milk incorrectly. Milk containing anise or chocolate is often served with a sandwich with fudge. This is another unique, yet very tasty find of the Dutch.

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What Are Stroopwafels? What You Need To Know About This Dutch Cookie

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What Are Stroopwafels? What You Need To Know About This Dutch Cookie

In the Netherlands, there is one dish that really stood out as something completely different from anything you’ve ever tried: the stroopwafel.

True to their name, stroopwafels have waffles. It consists of two very thin, crispy waffles with a sweet layer of warm caramel syrup in between. If you buy them at the grocery store, the caramel isn’t warming but is still a delicious snack.Fresh stroopwafels are the perfect balance of crunchy, buttery waffles and sweet, warm caramel. They’re incredibly messy and the caramel will likely drip all over the place, so keep napkins handy.

#SpoonTip: If you’re buying the Stroopwafel at a market, they’ll probably dip it in chocolate for you if you ask. It only costs a euro or more.

Where Do Stroopwafels Come From?

Stroopwafel was invented in Gouda , in the Netherlands in the early 19th century when a baker wanted to find a way to use his leftovers. This isn’t the only dish Gouda is famous for. It is best known for its cheese , with which it shares its name.

Around the same time that stroopwafels were invented, a specific way of eating them was also developed. A stroopwafel is meant to sit perfectly over a steaming cup of coffee or tea. You should leave it there for about two minutes to soften before enjoying your afternoon coffee. The Dutch love their coffee (the Amsterdam Coffee Festival is one of the largest in the world), so it makes sense that their traditional way of eating is very much linked to their daily cup of coffee.

Where to Find Stroopwafels in the USA?

Fortunately, stroopwafel has grown in popularity over the past few years, so it’s relatively easy to find in the US. The most common brand you can find in the US is Daelmans . They sell to big retailers like Target. Trader Joe’s also sells stropwafels, which come in a cute little tin and are perfect for entertaining guests

You can also find Stroopwafels at Dutch bakeries or smaller brands in your city. For example, this Spoon author started his own stroopwafel business.

I predict that Stroopwafels will become even more popular in the next few years until they become a well-known treat all over the world. For now, brands will work if you can’t beat the Atlantic supermarkets, but know that nothing compares to a bite of a fresh stropwafel while standing between canal houses and bikers. As the Dutch say, stroopwafels are ‘lekker!’

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