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Potential embryo excitement in fossil dinosaur eggs in the Netherlands

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Potential embryo excitement in fossil dinosaur eggs in the Netherlands

Dutch scientists concluded that it could be an embryo in his scan of fossil dinosaur eggs.

The Geology Museum, known as the ‘Oertijdmuseum’ in the city of Boxtel, is working on fossilized dinosaur eggs in hopes of finding embryos.

Museum curator Maarten de Rijke said one of the eggs “showed promising signs” that it contained embryos.

This is important news for the scientific community, as there are fewer than ten such fossils found worldwide.

After the news, which has the potential to shed light on dinosaur development, museum staff celebrated with ‘beschuit met muisjes’ snacks served at the birth of a new baby in the Netherlands.
Scientists want to investigate the possible embryo and how dinosaurs developed inside the egg and the process. For this reason, it has been announced that the egg fossil will be taken to Switzerland, where there is more technological equipment.

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Call from Bill Gates to Elon Musk: ‘Don’t go to Mars’

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Call from Bill Gates to Elon Musk Dont go to Mars

Bill Gates, one of the founding partners of Microsoft, made a call to Elon Musk in an interview with BBC reporter Amon Rajan.

Gates said that there are many problems that need to be solved on Earth, and that’s why Elon Musk should not go to Mars.
After leaving Microsoft, Bill Gates, trying to raise awareness to find solutions to the problems in the world, addressed the famous businessman Elon Musk.

Gates made a call to SpaceX owner Elon Musk in a statement to the BBC. Gates stated that it is very costly to work on SpaceX to go to Mars, and therefore he is against working.

Gates said that the resource spent on Mars can be used to solve urgent problems on Earth. He stated that instead of going to Mars, Elon Musk can buy measles vaccines and thus save lives. Elon Musk did not respond to this statement.

“FRONT AND FINALLY THEY WILL SPEND ON GOOD JOBS”

Bill Gates also said in a statement that wealthy people like Jeff Bezos, owner of Amazon, and Warren Buffett, owner of the Barkshire Hathaway investment company, will have a similar fate and will dedicate their fortunes to “good deeds eventually.”

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Samsung executive didn’t give her daughter a smartphone until she was 11

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Samsung executive didnt give her daughter a smartphone until she was 11

Samsung Mobile’s UK Executive Vice President, James Kitto, announced that he didn’t give his daughter a smartphone until he was 11.

Kitto, who started his job at Samsung in December last year, said in the Today program broadcast on BBC Radio 4, “The important thing is to be safe while surfing the internet, no matter what age the smartphone user is,” and added:

“My daughter had a smartphone when she was 11 years old. No matter how old you decide to give your child a smartphone, if he has access to the internet, make sure he does so safely.”

Amanda Spielman, the director of Ofsted, which is affiliated with the government, which carries out school and education inspections in England, had recently been on the agenda when she said that she was very surprised that children in private schools have smart phones.

Spielman said that he was uncomfortable with the unlimited internet access of young children and that it would be good to limit children’s access to adult content and porn.

Even children as young as nine are exposed to porn online, according to a study published this week.

“Worrying”

All mobile phone manufacturers in the country offer free parental controls to limit what their children can see online, according to UK media monitoring agency Ofcom. But he says children should be careful when sharing photos or using social media.

A study by research firm Childwise suggests that three-quarters of nine- and 10-year-olds have access to a cell phone. About 60 percent have a phone, while 14 percent have access to the phone of family members or friends. In addition, more than two-thirds of children access the Internet.

According to this report, called Childwise Monitor 2023, 8 percent of five- and six-year-olds have a phone, with 8 percent accessing the phones of family members or friends. That number is 43 and 23 percent for seven- and eight-year-olds, respectively.

In a survey conducted earlier in the week, 16-21 year olds were asked when they saw pornography for the first time.

As a result, it turned out that 10 percent of children up to the age of nine had seen pornography, and half of children up to age 13 had been exposed to it.

Children who go to school have easier access to the phone.

The findings show a link between watching porn and low self-esteem in children.

Dame Rachel de Souza, head of the UK Children’s Commission, says this is extremely worrying.

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Apple suffers biggest drop in sales since 2019

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Apple suffers biggest drop in sales since 2019

Tech giant Apple’s sales declined at the end of 2022 as the purchasing power of customers facing rising cost of living declined.

The iPhone’s manufacturer’s sales fell 5% in the last quarter of 2022 compared to the same period in 2021.

This was the biggest quarterly drop since 2019 and was worse than forecast.

The drop comes as many firms warn of a sharp economic slowdown, especially for the tech sector, which has been on the rise during the pandemic.

Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook, said the firm was operating in a “challenging environment”.

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Spotify founder enters healthcare industry

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Spotify founder enters healthcare industry

Spotify founder Daniel Ek, who entered the health sector with Neko Health, which uses the artificial intelligence system, seems to draw attention.

Artificial intelligence has been in the healthcare industry for many years. Health-focused companies, which now resort to artificial intelligence systems for many transactions, allow diagnoses to be made in a shorter time or long-lasting transactions to be completed in a shorter time. In the light of this, it was noteworthy that Neko Health, which adopted a different system, and Dainel Ek, the founder of Spotify, also took part in the company. The company stands out with its 360-degree full-body scanner.

THERE ARE PROCESSES THAT ARE NOW OUT OF
The Swedish-based company has systems that allow body scanning without any action. This system, which enables the monitoring of heart functions, detection of skin redness and other deformations, has a structure that also offers real-time analysis.

The company was founded by Hjalmar Nilsonne and Daniel Ek to create a system to help people stay healthy through preventive health measures and early detection.

Nilsonne reported that Neko Health can perform a detailed scan covering the entire body of a person in just a few minutes, this is currently open to anyone in Sweden, but scans for $190 have already been sold out.

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Starlink statement for the earthquake zone from Elon Musk

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Starlink statement for the earthquake zone from Elon Musk

Elon Musk made a statement about the earthquake that occurred in Turkey.

“As soon as the Turkish government approves, we can send our SpaceX company Starlink satellites to Turkey,” Musk said.
Elon Musk, owner of SpaceX and Twitter, made a statement about the earthquake that occurred in Turkey.

“As soon as the Turkish government approves, our SpaceX company can send our Starlink satellites to Turkey,” Musk said. used the phrases.

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Earth orbit is on the verge of disaster

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Earth orbit is on the verge of disaster

LeoLabs officials stated that the two objects missed each other by just 6 meters.

The brink of a catastrophic collision in low-Earth orbit has been swept away.

Satellite tracking and collision detection firm LeoLabs announced that the two discarded spacecraft missed each other by a narrow margin. The collision would occur between a rocket body from the Soviet Union and a spy satellite.

According to LeoLabs’ statement, on January 27, the distance between two objects was measured in meters only. Fortunately, however, the collision did not occur.

BOTH SPACE VESSELS AND astronauts can be damaged

LeoLabs officials stated that the two objects missed each other by only 6 meters. Experts say such a collision would cause thousands of dangerous pieces to emerge in Earth orbit.

The number of spacecraft parts in low Earth orbit is increasing. As they collide with each other, they form smaller and more dangerous pieces.

According to Independent Turkish’s report, these pieces, which scientists call space junk or space debris, may hit the International Space Station, which is home to functioning satellites and astronauts in orbit.
This could result in damage to both spacecraft and astronauts.

US officials state that they track nearly 30,000 space debris in orbit. But there’s also a lot of space junk that’s too small to detect from Earth’s surface, according to NASA.

According to LeoLabs, one of the two objects that narrowly missed each other was the SL-8 rocket. This class of rocket was used to launch spacecraft between 1964 and 2009.

The second piece was the Russian spy satellite Cosmos 2361, designed to intercept electronic signals such as radio communications and radar transmissions. This spacecraft was launched in 1998.

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Metals, minerals and rare earths discovered on the seabed in Norway

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Metals minerals and rare earths discovered on the seabed in Norway

According to a study conducted in Norway, significant amounts of metals and minerals, from copper to rare earth elements, have been found on the seafloor.

The Scandinavian country, a major oil and gas exporter, is considering whether to open its offshore regions to deep-sea mining, which requires parliamentary approval.

“Magnesium, niobium, cobalt and rare earth minerals from the metals found on the seafloor in the study area are on the European Commission’s critical minerals list,” said the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD), which conducted the study.

The resource estimate, covering remote areas in the Norwegian Sea and the Greenland Sea, showed that 38 million tons of copper and 45 million tons of zinc were deposited in polymetallic sulfides each year, almost twice the volume extracted globally.

“Expensive, rare minerals such as neodymium and dysprosium are extremely important for magnets in wind turbines and motors of electric vehicles,” NPD said.

However, this study received backlash from environmental groups. Activists urged Norway to postpone seafloor mineral exploration until further studies are conducted on the organisms living on the seabed and the impact mining has on them.

The International Seabed Authority, a UN-affiliated agency that oversees the deep-sea mining industry, is expected to announce regulations for the nascent sector in July. Many scientists have warned that deep-sea mining could have enormous and irreversible effects on the sensitive ecosystem.

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When will the Netherlands disappear?

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When will the Netherlands disappear

The low-lying nation has been managing water for generations.

Now, total flooding is a threat due to climate change.
Netherlands OVERDIEPSE POLDER — The local phone book in the Dutch region of Noordwaard contains information about a long-gone community: lists of the numbers of houses that have been torn down and left only as square patches of grass in their places.

Noordwaard, formerly a prosperous farming region, is now a vast stretch of reedy marshlands in the southwest of the Netherlands that is purposefully engineered to flood in order to keep surrounding Dutch cities dry. According to a local dairy farmer named Stan Fleerakkers, “the polder used to have big, lovely farms there, acres with potatoes and onions.”

“Now there’s nothing left of it when you drive there.”

The Noordwaard polder was one of 39 such regions that the Dutch government chose for its “Room for the River” program, which involved returning land to rivers. It represents a contemporary reversal of the illustrious low-lying nation’s long-standing tradition of land reclamation.

It also provides a glimpse of the challenges the nation may confront in the future: The Dutch government is working against the time to come up with a solution to prevent one of the richest nations in the world from submerging into the North Sea due to the catastrophic sea level rise predicted as a result of climate change.

Forecasts for sea level rise range from tolerable levels, if the rise is gradual, to catastrophic scenarios that would exceed the capacity of government to respond. Experts are quietly starting to simulate potential futures for the government.

If emissions keep up their current pace, the IPCC projects that sea levels will rise by up to 5.4 meters by 2300 and 84 centimeters by 2100.

In more hopeful circumstances, the celebrated Dutch dikes, storm barriers, pumps, and modifications can handle the situation, but at a cost, and even then, only to a certain extent.

According to Maarten Kleinhans, professor of geosciences and physical geography at Utrecht University, “on the other end of the spectrum is controlled abandonment, which isn’t good since we somehow need to lead 10 million people someplace.” “And there won’t be any investments longer, and local economies will collapse as soon as this becomes known, as soon as the s— hits the fan.”

This is a nightmarish situation, but it’s a serious one, he continued.
If emissions keep on their current pace, the IPCC estimates that sea levels will rise by 84 centimeters by 2100 and as much as 5.4 meters by 2300.

When will the Netherlands disappear 3

Rising seas

Sea level rise to some extent is already unavoidable due to global warming and ice sheet melting brought on by decades of carbon emissions. Even if nations fulfill their commitments to reduce emissions under the Paris Climate Agreement, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations body that compiles and evaluates scientific findings, projects a sea level increase of 30 to 60 centimeters by 2100. The probability of an uncontrollable rise decreases when emissions are reduced more quickly. However, the developed world hasn’t yet achieved its goals.

If emissions keep up their current pace, the IPCC projects that sea levels will rise by up to 5.4 meters by 2300 and 84 centimeters by 2100.

The IPCC also cautioned at-risk nations to make preparations since a rise of more than a meter by 2100 is not improbable. Many nations would be helpless to respond in time if the rate of increase continued to rise so quickly and accelerated rises were sure to follow.

A snowball effect caused by rising sea levels enhances the rate at which the problem will persist. In essence, things will only get worse from here: Greenhouse gas bubbles that have been trapped escape, accelerating global warming, and melting snow and ice melts away. The Antarctic ice sheet is also so massive that it pulls the waters toward it gravitationally: Sea water will redistribute away from the South Pole as it contracts, adding to the rise.

According to Michiel van den Broeke, a professor of polar meteorology at Utrecht University, “we’ve lost over half the Arctic ice now, and both the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are losing mass and contributing to sea level rise significantly.”

We should take great care not to pass this tipping point because doing so would require us to accept sea level rises of many meters, which the Netherlands is unable to handle. This process is also irreversible at some point.

Depending on the amount of time available for preparation, the Netherlands can tolerate a rise of up to a few meters. The Dutch government claims that present defenses are sufficient through 2050.

The Netherlands was able to cope with merely 40 more millimeters of sea level rise because to flood protection work done over the past 30 years.

Trade-offs are also associated with the options offered. If there is enough time and sand, beaches can be covered in sand. It is possible to elevate the dikes, but doing so puts the people who live there in greater danger if something goes wrong. Additionally, they are permeable; salt cannot be pumped out, but water can. As a result, the land becomes more salinized, which has an impact on Dutch agriculture.

The Dutch take great pleasure in their ability to handle water. The Dutch government is currently making an effort to be proactive.

Storm barriers can be closed, however doing so prevents cargo to the Rotterdam port, which contributes significantly to the Dutch economy. The Dutch fishing sector is also impacted by shoreline interference. Additionally, if the land is below sea level, the rivers that cross it must be pumped through the sea barriers, which uses energy.

There comes a time when preserving the land is not economically feasible.

“A lot is technically feasible. We can build dikes or coastal defenses. However, you must eventually consider whether this is a workable approach, according to van den Broeke. “Retreat is the Plan B. Return a portion of the land to the sea.

The fact that large portions of the nation are already sinking doesn’t help. It is a phenomenon that occurs frequently in deltas around the world: human habitation halts the sedimentation processes that lifted the land initially; ground water extraction further lowers it; and the land contracts under its own weight. The megalopolis of the Randstad, which consists of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague, and Utrecht, is the crown jewel of Dutch wealth and industry. It is situated in the west of the Netherlands, which is susceptible and low-lying.

According to Kleinhans, some of the Netherlands’ lowest points are already 10 meters below sea level. “The sea would roughly reach Utrecht, in the center of the Netherlands, if you breached the coast at this time. There is a false sense of security and the situation is truly terrifying.

When will the Netherlands disappear 2

 

Creating a future map

The Dutch take great pleasure in their ability to handle water. It has an advantage over other low-lying regions of the world due to its affluence, institutional readiness, and technical know-how.

The regional Water Boards, some of which date back to the 13th century, are autonomous from the national government, which enables them to make plans that go beyond the scope of electoral cycles. Strong relationships between scientists and policymakers have been established, and there is close institutional cooperation.

However, significant flood works have frequently been reactive in response to tragedies like the 1953 storm that burst the dikes and inundated nearly a tenth of the farms in the Netherlands. In addition to destroying homes and drowning tens of thousands of animals, the calamity claimed 1,836 lives.

The Dutch government is currently making an effort to be proactive.

This year, it paid the Sea Level Rise Knowledge Programme, a team of professionals, to keep track on the problem and identify viable solutions. According to Marjolijn Haasnoot, an environmental scientist at the research center Deltares and Utrecht University who has spearheaded the creation of future scenario planning in the Netherlands, the group is focusing on four scenarios.
Two of the scenarios, “Protect Open” and “Protect Closed,” ask for bolstering fortifications using currently available resources with the choice of having storm barriers open or closed. The Netherlands reclaims extra territory from the sea and constructs islands on it in the third scenario, “Advance,” which is an attack scenario.

“Accommodate” is about withdrawal, figuring out which regions of the Netherlands may be kept and which need to be returned to the sea to protect the others. The plan calls for the construction of dikes, water pumping, and the intentional creation of floodplains. Some structures could be made to float; residences could be built on stilts or terps, an ancient type of mound.

Haasnoot has created a model that maps out various future scenarios and decides what measures should be performed in response to each one to aid in choosing the best strategy in preparing for a still unclear future.

Although she predicted that retreat would not be required in the following 100 years, she also cautioned that some of the other possibilities, while technically possible, would cause disruption. For instance, there are costs and trade-offs associated with raising the dikes, reducing the tolerable flood risk, stepping up pumping, and closing the storm barriers.

She also cautioned that what is to come might be more complicated than anything the Dutch have hitherto dealt with. “We need to act quickly since it’s possible that the sea level may rise beyond 2050 at a considerably higher rate, according to Haasnoot. “Some of the behaviors may be quite significant. We have no prior experience with that.”

Roadblocks

The problems associated with sea level rise are difficult for scientists to explain to the public, but they maintain that we must keep trying. They claim that it is politically challenging because it necessitates making present sacrifices in order to achieve a distant and uncertain future.

Even though it won’t happen for a long time, Haasnoot noted that the repercussions are significant and managing the delta will be difficult. “We must take action now and not wait till we see the results.”

The Netherlands is likely to fall short of its goal to cut emissions by 30% from 1990 levels by 2020. Seven political parties, including those on the left and right, came together last summer to enact a climate change law that aims to reduce emissions by 95% by the year 2050.

However, efforts to take more action have been resisted vehemently by individuals who will be impacted.

In October, Dutch farmers blockaded cities all around the country with their tractors in opposition to government initiatives to reduce nitrogen pollution, which is mostly brought on by the farming and construction sectors.

“In Holland, water management costs a lot of money. If we don’t, we’ll be swamped, therefore we have to do it.” – Dairyman Stan Fleerakkers.

Four regional governments stopped the measures as a result of the army being sent in to defend The Hague. Similar protests by construction workers using trucks and diggers were held after that, according to the traffic authority ANWB, causing backups of 380 kilometers.

“The effects of this will be felt for many decades and centuries. It takes a very courageous politician to take on,” remarked van den Broeke of Utrecht University. “It does take strong leadership to accomplish these changes because there is still a sizable portion of the Dutch people that is either unaware of or uninterested in these concerns.”

Professor of physical geography Kleinhans thinks that the general public’s perception of security and faith in flood protection is incorrect.

According to Kleinhans, “It’s a belief founded on the past.” “We’re facing a crisis unlike anything in human history, and possibly in geological history. We have never faced a situation like this, and we are unprepared.

When will the Netherlands disappear

A space for the water

The Netherlands may, however, be left with no choice but to adapt or even withdraw in the end. The Dutch model’s limitations are shown by a group of farmers at the Overdiepse Polder, which is close to the evacuated Noordwaard marshlands.

Stan Fleerakkers and his other 15 farmers were first made aware that their land was under consideration for the Room for the River program—a response to the 1995 Rhine floods, which required the evacuation of 250,000 people—by a brief item in a local newspaper.

Fleerakkers recalled, “We understood if we are going to fight the government, we are going to lose. “We made the decision to work with the government, and this is now our plan. We want to remain here, continue farming, and grow.

Instead of leaving, half of the farmers persuaded the authorities to assist them in staying. The outcome is unquestionably an engineering and planning achievement. The farmers now reside in sizable, Scandinavian-style farmhouses that were recently constructed on terps that were elevated six meters above their meadow grounds and connected to the closest village by roads that were lifted by the same amount. They take their animals up into their high barns for the winter.
The cost of staying is that their land now serves as a basin that will intentionally flood in order to protect the neighbouring cities of Waalwijk and’s-Hertogenbosch. The barrier at the end of their fields, beyond which container ships travel along the Maas, was purposefully lowered to allow river water to enter the fields when it reaches a particular level.

It is anticipated to seriously flood twice a century and once every 25 years.

As sea levels rise further, the question of whether such strategy is scalable arises. The Overdiepse farmers were relocated at a period of luxury, both in terms of time and money. From 1999 to 2015, 16 farmers were relocated. Money was used to grease every step of the procedure.
The historic property of Fleerakkers was generously purchased by the government. While the government constructed the terp and dike works for his new home, he continued to live there and work on it. He is entitled to compensation for any damages and lost crops if a flood ever happens outside of the winter months.

Additionally, if he ever decides to move, the government will purchase his farm at the same price as farms that are not situated in floodplains.

It’s less expensive than when a village floods, according to Fleerakkers. “In Holland, water management costs a lot of money. If we don’t, we will be swamped, and there won’t be any factories or residents left. Everything will be gone.”

 

Check out on this website which areas are at risk of flooding year after year.

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Google develops artificial intelligence that turns text into music

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Google develops artificial intelligence that turns text into music

Google researchers have developed an application that uses a new artificial intelligence system to create music from written commands.

After DALL-E and ChatGPT, which opened the door to a new era in technology, artificial intelligence came into play this time for music.

Google developed an artificial intelligence technology called MusicLM that turns text into music

MusicLM can create minute-by-minute music tracks from text prompts, transforming a whistled or humming melody into other instruments, similar to how DALL-E creates images through texts.

Although there have been similar studies in the past, it has been reported that MusicLM outperforms previous systems in terms of both sound quality and adherence to text description. There are 30-second tracks that look like real songs, built from paragraph-length descriptions that predict atmosphere and even specific instruments, as well as five-minute tracks made from a word or two like “melodic techno.”

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The new discovery, weighing 7 kilograms in Antarctica, will shed light on the secrets of the universe

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The new discovery weighing 7 kilograms in Antarctica will shed light on the secrets of the universe

An international research team in Antarctica found a 7.7 kilogram meteorite during its expedition.

This discovery is thought to be one of the largest among meteorites ever found in the region.

It was stated that the meteorite discovered by an international team at the end of an 11-day expedition was the size of an average pumpkin and weighed 7.7 kilograms.

The boulder, containing material from billions of years ago, fell to Earth from one of the largest meteorites ever found in Antarctica and possibly from the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter.
The Field Museum of Natural History in the USA announced that only 100 of the 45,000 meteorites taken from Antarctica in the last century are this size.

According to the news in Milliyet, it was stated that the meteorite was sent to the Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences for chemical analysis, while researcher Maria Valdes said, “All meteorites definitely have something to say about the evolution of the Earth.”

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